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Cover of New Direction’s printed edition

Tennessee Williams’s A Streetcar Named Desire is a play about the fight for control in an American household and who decides the winner of that fight. Throughout the play, Blanche DuBois, a white, upper-class, old-moneyed woman, struggles to exert control over Stanley Kowalski, a middle-class man who, while American, is of recent Polish ancestry and thus lower in the American ethnic hierarchy. The play presents its reader with a problem: in the Kowalski household, there are three people but only two rooms; one person, either Blanche or Stanley, must leave. The play tracks their struggle to be the one who…


Author’s Note: This article was written for the November Issue of the political magazine at my school. All photos belong to their respective owners.

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Trump at a rally in 2020 (Getty Images)

As Philip Elliot wrote in a 2020 TIME article, the Republican party has become an “appendage” of President Donald Trump. Now without a platform, Elliot writes, the party has latched onto “personality and feelings” with their enactment of “gut-driven policies”. Elliot’s assessment of the GOP reflects a shift of the party from one that aligned itself with Reagan to one that now aligns itself with Trump. While this pathos-driven approach and its policies might be successful…


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The Movie’s Poster, featuring all three Vanessa Hudgenses

Author’s Notes: This was written for my school’s entertainment magazine. Since its publication, people have thankfully started to talk about the glaring Christmas Prince plot hole. Also, spoilers ahead! All credit for photos goes to their respective owners.

There’s nothing quite like a Netflix Christmas movie. They are the best of the worst — they have better production values, better advertising, more famous casts, are more easily accessible, and have more original concepts than their notorious Hallmark counterparts. Every year for the past few years, as the weather gets colder, my recommended page gets flooded with red and green posters…


Despite strict moral codes, the Victorian public was fascinated with the infamous “ladies of the night” — prostitutes. Throughout period literature, art, and science, the idea of the “fallen woman” was prevalent. At the same time of the popularization of portrayals of women who fell from grace, Victorian society also imposed restraints on what women could do (which is to say they could not be anything but housewives), as well as strict codes of morality. How could two polar opposite interests exist at once? …


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Throughout the COVID-19 epidemic, there has been a heavy focus on social distancing, shuttering schools and stores as quickly as possible, the economic crisis, and frontline workers who battle a novel disease. This is rightly so. As of May 17th, more than four and a half million cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed and hundreds of thousands have died as a result. In this rush, however, the impact of the pandemic and the social distancing measures on mental health have become an afterthought.

Even before the pandemic started, loneliness was a major mental health issue. According to a 2019 report…


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A poster for the 2011 Movie “A Cinderella Story: Once Upon a Song”

The broad definition of Orientalism is a “genre of literature and painting that portrayed the non-western peoples of North Africa and Asia as exotic, sensuous, and economically backwards with respect to Europeans”.[1] However, this definition fails to acknowledge how Orientalism was able to be developed, the truths and falsehoods of that depiction, and the lasting impacts it has in modern media. That is what Edward Said sets out to cover in his 1978 book Orientalism. Said argues that the notion of Orientalism originated because of nineteenth century European imperialism. One topic Said discusses in the book is how Orientalism led…

Sydney Weiner

A student publishing essays, short stories, and other pieces I’m currently writing. Come along for the ride

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